Author Archives: Jack E. Rosenblatt, MD

Evidence-based management of akathisia

This comprehensive literature review cum treatment recommendation pertaining to neuroleptic-induced akathisia (by an international collaboration of pharmacists and psychiatrists first-authored by the University of Calgary’s Tamara Pringsheim and colleagues, Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 63(11):719-729, 2018) comprises both of the two principal themes of adverse effect management–prophylaxis and intervention. It begins by pointing out that akathisia was “largely overlooked until the … Read the rest

Flawed consensus statement for tardive dyskinesia

Intended as a statement of consensus to inform a standard of care in persons with tardive dyskinesia, this report, by authors of record Stanley Caroff, Les Citrome, and colleagues, published last spring in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (2020, March-April (81(2): 19cs12983), is presented as an investigational study, but it is not designed to test a null hypothesis, nor does … Read the rest

Methylphenidate bioavailability increased by alcohol

This four-way, unblinded, uncontrolled comparison by University of Michigan pharmacist H.J. Zhu and colleagues (from the University of South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina, and the University of Tennessee) (H.J. Zhu and colleagues, Journal of Clinical Psycho- pharmacology 37(4): 419-428, 2017) regretably suffers from a lack of blindedness and placebo control that its torturously long discussion leaves unassuaged.

The … Read the rest

Pregabalin and gabapentin side effects differ

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“Gabapentinoid” differences hidden in plain view

The exposition of this epidemiologic survey of “gabapentinoids,” by an elite research collaboration that includes groups at the University of Oxford and Sweden’s Karolinska Institute (Yasmina Molero and colleagues, British Medical Journal 365: 12147, 2019 (published online on June 12, 2019)), seems to have hidden in plain view what may prove critical differences … Read the rest

An opioid adjunct for treatment-resistant depression

Besides apprising us of the height at which FDA currently sets the bar for approval of new drugs in psychiatry, the recent approval of the s-enantiomer of ketamine for treatment-resistant depression provides grist for conjecture about what may be an increasing resemblance between criteria for approval of prescription drugs, which traditionally have required compelling evidence (before approval) of both safety … Read the rest